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Terminology Note. People often use the terms "Privacy Notice" and "Privacy Policy" synonymously, especially when referring to statements on a company website.  However, the International Association of Privacy Professionals ("IAPP") explains the term "Privacy Policy" to refer to the internal organization statement of the policies designed to communicate what practices to follow to those inside the organization, and "Privacy Notice" for external communications.  In practice, however, "Privacy Policy" is often used to describe either.  Beebe Law uses "Privacy Notice" on it's website for the public facing notice but for the purpose of this webpage, we will refer to the public facing information on a website as a "Privacy Policy."


What is a Privacy Policy?  A website/app Privacy Policy is the agreement that discloses your data privacy practices, how you handle your users' personal information/data, and if you share or otherwise sell any of the data.  These agreements are legally required by global privacy laws if you collect or use personal information, regardless of the platform used.  Similarly, these agreements can be required even if you don't collect data but use third-party tools (like Google Analytics, etc.).  Examples of such laws requiring Privacy Policies include EU General Data Protection Regulation ("GDPR") and the California Consumer Privacy Act ("CCPA"), both of which can impact Arizona entities depending on the nature of your business and customers.


Why do I need a Privacy Policy?

  • They are legally required.  That should be the "mic drop" as it's the most important reason.
  • Your website/app users expect to see them.  In a world where every Tom, Pat and Sally can create a website or app, consumers are leery of shady looking websites.  Having a properly drafted Terms of Service and Privacy Policy can go a long way towards showing gaining consumer trust.


Who requires Privacy Policies? 

  • Global and State Laws (which can impact Arizona entities depending on the nature of the business and customers)
    • E.g., EU General Data Protection Regulation ("GDPR")
    • E.g., California consumer Privacy Act ("CCPA")
  • Third-party tools
    • ​analytics tools
    • accepting payments
    • ads and remarketing
  • ​App stores
    • ​Apple App Store
    • Google Play App Store
    • ​Microsoft Windows Phone Store


What kind of platforms need a Privacy Policy?  This type of an agreement belongs on the following types of platforms:

  • Websites
  • WordPress blogs (or other similar blog type platforms)
  • E-commerce stores
  • Mobile apps: IOS, Android or Windows Phone
  • Desktop apps
  • Facebook apps
  • SaaS apps
  • Digital products or digital services


What kind of information can be considered "personal information"?  Information privacy is concerned with establishing rules that govern the collection and handling of personal information and therefore understanding what constitutes "personal information" is incredibly important. Central to this point is learning what types of information can be linked to a particular person versus information that is merely obtained in the aggregate or statistical information.  Here in the United States the terms "personal information" and "personally identifiable information" (often shortened to "PII") include information that makes it possible to identify an individual.  Examples of personal information can include:

  • names
  • social security number/passport number
  • driver's license numbers
  • birthdates
  • street address/billing address
  • telephone numbers
  • Geo-location information ("GPS")
  • health information
  • biometric information (fingerprints, facial patterns, voice or typing cadence, etc.)
  • email addresses
  • social media handles and profile images
  • ​Internet Protocol ("IP") address
  • financial information


If you don't have a website Privacy Policy, or started with one of those generic free or low-cost forms, that's okay!  Better late than never! If this is you, and you're ready to elevate your business reputation and protect your business by having us draft or otherwise review your existing Privacy Policy, contact us!







Website Privacy Policies

Of course people read these things... Well, sometimes. Okay, maybe enough just to see that you are legit - and that, outside of protecting you, is what's important!